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steptoe as social history

An opportunity to discuss other TV comedy shows of interest to Steptoe fans.

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steptoe as social history

Postby martin » Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:19 pm

as a life long follower of steptoe i'm allways amazed at the rich acting talents of both actors.
and each time you watch them you can see both of them evolve thru time. its easy to dismiss them
as just comedy parts - after all these yrs i can still feel the emotions of the drama !
its much more then comedy - probably only dad's army can somewhere compere.
anyone agree?
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby Archie » Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:47 pm

Welcome to the forum martin :)

Good 1st post, I watched most of the episodes first time , the show does indeed reflect the changes in British society good and bad from the 60's through to the 70's :o
Eeh I wanna see the Nudes of 1964
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Mon Mar 26, 2012 11:09 am

Archie wrote:...the show does indeed reflect the changes in British society good and bad...

Decimalisation for a start! I knew no good would come of it, 30 seconds worth of red hot porn and they change the currency :( It's difficult to name an episode that isn't sociology. Some were more than others of course, the first act of "Back In Fashion" comes to mind. But I can't think of an episode that didn't (and continues to) reflect the times. The commentary was often subtle, always open to interpretation, but clear.
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby bob » Mon Mar 26, 2012 7:31 pm

In a TV interview Harry once said words to the effect that the only thing at the time that was making a political and social comment was Steptoe.
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby PhilGlass » Wed Apr 11, 2012 6:47 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:Decimalisation for a start!


Not only the show, Wilfrid himself recorded "The Decimal Song" - although it appears to be a nice little ditty, it's actually quite politically charged when you put it in context of 1971. It is against decimalisation. Apparently several stars did the same with different songs / records.
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby harryfaversham » Sun Apr 15, 2012 12:02 am

welcome back Phil
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby stephen68 » Wed Apr 18, 2012 9:20 pm

RE: The changing times during the Steptoe years, just a short point in the episode Wallah Wallah catsmeat, when the horse is laid up
there is a good number of horse and carts turn up to help while Hercules is supposedly ill, and in the Steptoe & Son ride again film when Albert is pretending to be dead, one of the other traders(played by Neil McCarthy if memory serves) states how rag & boning is a dying trade, so in the 8 or 9 years between the episode and the film the trade has virtually died out.
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Re: steptoe as social history

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Tue Aug 11, 2015 7:21 pm

stephen68 wrote:RE: The changing times during the Steptoe years, just a short point in the episode Wallah Wallah catsmeat, when the horse is laid up there is a good number of horse and carts turn up to help while Hercules is supposedly ill, and in the Steptoe & Son ride again film when Albert is pretending to be dead, one of the other traders(played by Neil McCarthy if memory serves) states how rag & boning is a dying trade, so in the 8 or 9 years between the episode and the film the trade has virtually died out.

Are horse and cart still permitted on London city roads? Obviously not the M25 or lanes near farms, but the city thoroughfares where it wasn’t all that many years ago, they could be seen. I could be wrong, but with the exception of mounted police and royal carriages, I’m guessing London rag and bone horse & cart didn’t "die out", they were driven to extinction by real estate porn. And before any estate agents get upset, that isn’t political commentary or criticism, it’s social history with a comedic conscience and that’s how I’ve always chosen to interpret Steptoe, and always will. As fans, of course we’re going to be a bit prejudiced, but the more British sitcoms I see, the clearer it becomes that Steptoe is arguably the finest sitcom yet created for the English language :D.
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