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cockney rhyming slang!

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Postby callous_little_bleeder » Sat Mar 13, 2010 12:51 am

Not exactly cockney or rhyming slang but 'shitehawk' gave me a grin when I learned of its meaning.

Urban Dictionary wrote:Shitehawk: A common expression in Ireland meaning the poorest of the poor - a person whose trade is selling cow-dung as a manure.


Particularly crude ones that should've been used (or maybe they have) are:

Pony and trap = crap
Deaf and dumb = bum
Thrupenny bits = tits (I know 'Bristols' has been used before in many an episode. Bristol City - titty)

:lol:
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Postby bob » Sat Mar 13, 2010 3:28 am

Another one that Albert uses to describe the part of his body that resides in the back of his trousors is .... Aris not as some people think .... Harris.

True Cockney slang this one, as it takes two steps to get there.

Aristotle = Bottle

Bottle and Glass = Arse

Not sure the top brass at the BBC caught on !!

Nice posting Bleeder - Come on you Lions !!!
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Postby callous_little_bleeder » Sat Mar 13, 2010 3:51 am

bob wrote:Nice posting Bleeder - Come on you Lions !!!

"No one likes us..."

<raises glass>

In a cheerful way of course. :wink:
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Postby PhilGlass » Sat Mar 13, 2010 1:27 pm

Thanks Bob, I always thought it was Harris.

G&S got away with so much - if they had simply wrote what they meant it would never have been broadcast.

I remember doing a university project on censorship and I emailed some questions to Ray and Alan and got a personal response. One story they recalled to me was that 'The Piano' had questions asked in parliament about whether such filth should be allowed on tv because of the word 'bleeding' (and the mention of 'im being kinky!)

Yet nobody minded the wog jokes! How times have reversed themselves!! You can call someone a t**t now, that's fine. But mention where he's from before hand and it's offensive.
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Postby bob » Sat Mar 13, 2010 6:15 pm

I'm all for pushing the bounderies, as long as its funny
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Postby callous_little_bleeder » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:11 pm

Another one is "a load of old cobblers", which is thought to have been originated by Victorian barrow boys and the like to describe a lie or harsh disagreement.

As we know, a cobbler is someone who makes/repairs footwear for a living. They used a special pointed tool to puncture holes in shoes called a stitching 'awl' and this eventually became the basis for the word in rhyming slang.

Cobblers - cobbler's awls - balls - bollocks - nonsense, etc.
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Gold Watches

Postby akeem » Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:25 am

So whats gold watches, not gold watch - scotch. Its in T.B or not T.B when they talk to the first nurse in the mobile surgery thing. Something to do with snot, flem, mucus or sputum, something like that.
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Postby bob » Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:21 pm

Hi akeem and welcome to the forum.

I don't think gold wathces is rhyming slang but a nickname given to the condition raised by the nurse.

Without getting too vulgar, the things that are expectorated (spelling ??) look like old fashioned Gold Chain watches, hence gold watches.
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Postby Sacko » Fri Sep 23, 2011 7:13 pm

One or two quite explicit ones.

To the psychiatrist in Loathe Story. 'I've had more grumble than you've had hot dinners'

Grumble and grunt=rude word for a lady's foo foo.


As indeed is 'Berk' which is often said. Berkshire hunt = the lady's front bottom again.

I'm amazed thay got past the BBC but then in those days the BBC was ather a posh institution and possibly unaware of the meanings.
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Postby Ivor Biggun » Sun Sep 25, 2011 1:22 pm

Sacko wrote:One or two quite explicit ones.

To the psychiatrist in Loathe Story. 'I've had more grumble than you've had hot dinners'

Grumble and grunt=rude word for a lady's foo foo.


As indeed is 'Berk' which is often said. Berkshire hunt = the lady's front bottom again.

I'm amazed thay got past the BBC but then in those days the BBC was ather a posh institution and possibly unaware of the meanings.


It's not Berkshire hunt it's Berkeley Hunt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Hunt
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Postby Karl » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:17 am

I love all this Rhyming slang! especially in Steptoe & Son

(Dunno 'bout the Milwall reference though Bob! :lol: )

Being a Hammer it touched a nerve! LOL!!!
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....

Postby winstonlegthigh » Mon Sep 26, 2011 3:29 pm

The problem with a lot of cockney rhyming slang is that people seem to think, especially in todays world, that it's just a case of putting a rhyming phrase in place of a word but it's not and true cockneys are aware of the actual pre-existing terms. I was in a pub in Camden once and i heard someone use the term Britneys for beers, as in Britney Spears? Cringeworthy. Rhyming slang is characterised by a set of pre-existing terms and phrases, Steptoe rhyming slang is authentic but a lot of it you hear on telly these days is a load of rubbish.

Also, over-use of it just sounds inauthentic, like the way a lot of Guy Ritchie movies, this is how you can tell your authentic cockney from your Oxbridge educated spiv, you can almost see that Guy, bless his cotton socks, went into a library somewhere and looked up cockney rhyming slang and read that it was a method by which the criminal underclass in early england used to communicate to evade police understanding them, that doesn't mean it was a flaming language unto itself.
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Postby PhilGlass » Mon Sep 26, 2011 5:25 pm

This was one reason that only 2 of the radio series were adapted by Gae Pederick - he didnt have the grasp of cockney slang that Ray and Alan did, things like "Apple and Pears", so they decided to adapt them themselves. They were radio writers originally after all!

My favourite in Steptoe is "three parts Olivered!" Mainly because of H's delivery of the line!
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Re: ....

Postby Ivor Biggun » Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:42 pm

winstonlegthigh wrote:The problem with a lot of cockney rhyming slang is that people seem to think, especially in todays world, that it's just a case of putting a rhyming phrase in place of a word but it's not and true cockneys are aware of the actual pre-existing terms. I was in a pub in Camden once and i heard someone use the term Britneys for beers, as in Britney Spears? Cringeworthy. Rhyming slang is characterised by a set of pre-existing terms and phrases, Steptoe rhyming slang is authentic but a lot of it you hear on telly these days is a load of rubbish.

Also, over-use of it just sounds inauthentic, like the way a lot of Guy Ritchie movies, this is how you can tell your authentic cockney from your Oxbridge educated spiv, you can almost see that Guy, bless his cotton socks, went into a library somewhere and looked up cockney rhyming slang and read that it was a method by which the criminal underclass in early england used to communicate to evade police understanding them, that doesn't mean it was a flaming language unto itself.


Actually, like all forms of slang, Cockney is continually evolving. Old terms fall out of use when their meaning becomes obscured by time like if an old term referred to a famous person who is no longer recognized in the modern age, then the rhyme becomes meaningless so something new has to be created to replace it. The changing culture of an area also changes the slang. How many white Cockneys actually still live in the areas that are traditionally associated with them these days? They're all from the West Indies and Muslim countries in those parts now so references from white British culture are meaningless to them. There's probably not much left from the 60's and 70's Cockney that's still in use today.
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Postby bob » Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:41 pm

I bet they still know what a Ruby Murray is in Brick Lane !!!
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