Play Steptoe and Son GamesContact Us about anything do to with Steptoe and Son

"on the ear ole' again"

An opportunity to discuss any aspect of the TV series

Moderators: Archie, Dirty Old Yank, PhilGlass

"on the ear ole' again"

Postby steve sheffield » Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:43 pm

I have asked this in a previous thread but I would really love to know what this refers to. Albert says this a lot especially about the vicar. Refering to the vicar Albert says " is he on the ear ole' again?" Now I know this refers to ( scrounging / collecting) but I cannot understand what ( in cockney rhyming slang) it can relate to?
Anybody, bob your a millwall fan and from that neck of the woods!
Please help this uneducated northener.
3 Handkerchiefs and a pair of Y fronts. Enoch's dreaming of a white christmas.
User avatar
steve sheffield
 
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 2:21 pm
Location: On my way to Bognor

Postby bob » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:49 pm

Hi Steve

I rally have no idea, but like you I would be interested to find out.

The problem with the rhyming slang thing is that it dosn't always Rhyme !!!! For example in some places a "Jeffrey" is slang for £2000. This is named after that well know perjurer Lord Archer.

I can't give a good example but sometimes another related word takes the place of another slang word, so over time the derivation from the original slang and therefore meaning becomes lost.

Being on the "Ear ole" is a good one.

He ends the lecture. Nuff said

Up the Blades

Bob
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby Archie » Fri Oct 16, 2009 4:44 pm

A couple of name ones have always baffled me - Del for Derek as in Del boy.

Tel for Terry as in Terry Mc Cann.
:?:
Eeh I wanna see the Nudes of 1964
User avatar
Archie
 
Posts: 970
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 4:40 pm
Location: Largs Ayrshire Coast

Postby bob » Sun Oct 18, 2009 11:15 am

Hi Archie
This is only my opinion but I think it has something to do with the way us Londoners struggle with anything that is more than one syllable long. In my own case I have shortened my entire name to just two syllables !!!!

If you were to just use the first syllable of both names and use them they would have an eerr sound to them, they woould sound more like grunts and groans and the names wouldn't sound finished. In reallity its more of a W sound that is put at the end of the first syllable to give it end but they are spelt Del and Tel

Bob
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby Archie » Thu Oct 22, 2009 3:32 pm

One of my favourites is 'Syrup' for Ronnie Biggs - Syrup of Figs :) :)

Also cockney slang for a wig.
Eeh I wanna see the Nudes of 1964
User avatar
Archie
 
Posts: 970
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 4:40 pm
Location: Largs Ayrshire Coast

Postby PhilGlass » Mon Oct 26, 2009 12:25 am

There are a lot which dont make sense.

Where did 'Pony' and 'Monkey' come from?

I am from the North and we use a few of them, apple and pears is a common one, as well as asking someone to lend you a lady... no thats not what you think, we mean a Lady Godiver. A fiver.

Have a butchers at this... thats common too. But us northern folk have never been one for proper english like duck.

Awway man, use yer noggin!
"What do I want to go and see a film about Lesbians for?"
User avatar
PhilGlass
 
Posts: 1126
Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:41 pm
Location: Down the football club pulling a stripper!

Postby Archie » Thu Oct 29, 2009 3:51 pm

I'm sure S&S affected the way we speak today, 'Sod / Sod Off are regularly heard on the street :o

During the infamous 1976 Sex Pistols Bill Grundy interview they used the phrases, You dirty sod and you dirty old man, clearly both from Steptoe :)
Eeh I wanna see the Nudes of 1964
User avatar
Archie
 
Posts: 970
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 4:40 pm
Location: Largs Ayrshire Coast

Postby bob » Sun Nov 01, 2009 7:56 am

Poor Bill Grundy his career finished over night.

Another good slang expression for this time of year is "tatters" from Potatoes meaning cold. Don't know why !!!!!

Can anybody help ?
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby PhilGlass » Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:08 pm

Bob, I've found the answer!!

Looking on a website dedicated to rhyming slang I found that it comes from "Potatoes in the Mould" - COLD. This has been adapted to 'Taters in the mould', then 'taters'.

My mum says it often. Another I have heard is "It's Parky out there..." but whenever I look good old Michael Parkinson is nowhere to be seen, so I wonder about that one...
"What do I want to go and see a film about Lesbians for?"
User avatar
PhilGlass
 
Posts: 1126
Joined: Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:41 pm
Location: Down the football club pulling a stripper!

Postby bob » Thu Nov 05, 2009 8:33 pm

hi Phil

Thanks for the Tatters explanation. Yes Parky is another one, It most probably is similar to Potatoes in the Mould but no one can remember the original phrase etc.

Bob
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby bob » Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:08 pm

I might have an answer to the "on the ear ole" comment.

I was discussing the forum with a few friends and saying that Steve's question had got us stumped. One of my older friends said that it was not unknown for people to pretend they we not in when the rent / debt collector came to call. They therefore got into the habit of putting their ear to the door to see if they could hear anybody inside before knocking. Hence to be on the "ear ole" as a prelude to asking for money.

Albert always thinks the Vicar is after money, hence "on the ear ole"

Sounds good to me. (no pun intended)

So not rhyming slang but a typical cockney way of using language


So not rhyming slang but a typical cockney way of using language
Last edited by bob on Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby steve sheffield » Sun Nov 08, 2009 6:24 pm

Nice one bob, that does sound a feasible answer to me.
3 Handkerchiefs and a pair of Y fronts. Enoch's dreaming of a white christmas.
User avatar
steve sheffield
 
Posts: 195
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 2:21 pm
Location: On my way to Bognor

Postby Karl » Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:40 am

Could this "on the earole" thing simply derive from the way someone may tilt their head when listening in on the conversations of others-in a pub or somewhere,sort of gleaning info (something for nothing?)
just a theory! :lol:
"The only thing worth 'avin is that porcelain group on the mantlepiece behind your elbow......." "'Aint you got any woodbines?.. "
Karl
 
Posts: 164
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:11 am
Location: "the Skinners Arms"

Postby bob » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:46 am

I must admit Karl I tend to think the explanation I was given about debt collectors placing their ear to the door, to see if anybody was in, before knocking, has a ring of truth behind it.
User avatar
bob
Site Admin
 
Posts: 991
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:04 pm
Location: Bradwell on Sea, Essex

Postby callous_little_bleeder » Fri Mar 12, 2010 3:13 am

Archie wrote:During the infamous 1976 Sex Pistols Bill Grundy interview they used the phrases, You dirty sod and you dirty old man, clearly both from Steptoe :)

The Pistols are self-confessed fans of the show.

bob wrote:I was discussing the forum with a few friends and saying that Steve's question had got us stumped. One of my older friends said that it was not unknown for people to pretend they we not in when the rent / debt collector came to call. They therefore got into the habit of putting their ear to the door to see if they could hear anybody inside before knocking. Hence to be on the "ear ole" as a prelude to asking for money.

That's about right I think. I suppose it could be explained as simply bending one's earhole for money but I like your answer better. And I think it's more believable in terms of having some kind of history behind it.

And good to hear you're a Millwall boy. 8)
User avatar
callous_little_bleeder
 
Posts: 66
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Bromley, Kent


Return to The knobs are on my side

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron

 

 

Testing