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UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:14 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:There's nothing more uplifting, if not bowel loosening, in a film is to see a good set of teeth lol. Talking prosthetic dentures for a moment. That's ironic, if not a terrifying sight. Reminds me of character Amelia (Karen Black) and her full set of razor sharp dentures in the classic horror Trilogy Of Terror (1975) story with the African water spirit, and who cannot forget Fright Night (1985) with Charlie Brewster's squeeze Amy Peterson (Amanda Bearse aka Marcy Darcy in Married with Children) gigantic toothy smile in the cellar scene towards the end of the movie. Man, I'd never seen more teeth in one place since I watched that Crazy Horses music video on TV featuring the Osmond's brothers. It was flaretastic! :mrgreen:

The Osmond’s were akin really to a grinning idiot version of the Hindenburg disaster, “...OH the mediocrity!!:roll:.
Keith Richards* aside, another favorite set of teef run completely amok appear in John Carpenter’s "The Thing" defibrillator scene where Charlie Hallahan’s chest opens up exposing a colossal maw of gnashing, crooked canines. Lesson learned you kids: floss after every meal! Not to mention Richard Dysart’s severed hands, a painful reminder to dental hygienists: wear gloves, steel gauntlets preferred, and keep a precautionary flame thrower nearby :shock:.
“Evil Dead II” (1987) also has some classic examples of horrifying hampsteads as does “Mr. Sardonicus” (1961).
Ken Dodd’s incisors are favorites too, but nothing matches that cartload Harold brought home in The Economist. Chances are it wasn’t Amanda Bearse wearing that see-through negligee and extraordinary facial prosthetic.
I’ll wager Tom Savini’s brilliant makeup designs helped inspire that particular latex sculpture 8).

*What did Keef do with the old ones? Did he keep 'em?
Maybe they’re preserved in a jar somewhere, like Terry-Thomas’ teef in “Vault of Horror” :o.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Fri Jun 24, 2016 6:11 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:There's nothing more uplifting, if not bowel loosening, in a film is to see a good set of teeth lol. Talking prosthetic dentures for a moment. That's ironic, if not a terrifying sight. Reminds me of character Amelia (Karen Black) and her full set of razor sharp dentures in the classic horror Trilogy Of Terror (1975) story with the African water spirit, and who cannot forget Fright Night (1985) with Charlie Brewster's squeeze Amy Peterson (Amanda Bearse aka Marcy Darcy in Married with Children) gigantic toothy smile in the cellar scene towards the end of the movie. Man, I'd never seen more teeth in one place since I watched that Crazy Horses music video on TV featuring the Osmond's brothers. It was flaretastic! :mrgreen:

The Osmond’s were akin really to a grinning idiot version of the Hindenburg disaster, “...OH the mediocrity!!:roll:.
Keith Richards* aside, another favorite set of teef run completely amok appear in John Carpenter’s "The Thing" defibrillator scene where Charlie Hallahan’s chest opens up exposing a colossal maw of gnashing, crooked canines. Lesson learned you kids: floss after every meal! Not to mention Richard Dysart’s severed hands, a painful reminder to dental hygienists: wear gloves, steel gauntlets preferred, and keep a precautionary flame thrower nearby :shock:.
“Evil Dead II” (1987) also has some classic examples of horrifying hampsteads as does “Mr. Sardonicus” (1961).
Ken Dodd’s incisors are favorites too, but nothing matches that cartload Harold brought home in The Economist. Chances are it wasn’t Amanda Bearse wearing that see-through negligee and extraordinary facial prosthetic.
I’ll wager Tom Savini’s brilliant makeup designs helped inspire that particular latex sculpture 8).

*What did Keef do with the old ones? Did he keep 'em?
Maybe they’re preserved in a jar somewhere, like Terry-Thomas’ teef in “Vault of Horror” :o.


Yeah got to love the Osmond's, especially wee Jimmy lol. Also I can remember those 1970s made for TV films with Donny and Marie. Man, I'd never seen so many flares since the Sun had major solar activity which caused havoc with communications satellites. Bloody Rupert Murdoch. Aussie git. :shock:

Talking magic movie moments. Indeed John Carpenter's 1980 Thing re-make mentioned was a masterpiece. It was as good if not better than the original Thing From Another World (1951) I feel. Not many remakes are, but this was though. Yeah I agree about the autopsy and the Doctor not using surgical gloves. Saying that. What about the blood testing scene in which they cut their fingers with the same scalpel even though the mutant alien virus is so contagious. Slight flaw in the plot there. Also the scene where the Doctor losing his hands during the resuscitation was amazing, although my favourite part was subsequent head dropping off scene and developing spider leg appendages, then scampering off before being torched. OMG, that was horrific. 8)

You mention Vault Of Horror jar scene in story Neat Job. Brilliant. Terry Thomas is paranoid about his home and stuck in his ways. Why he married is nobodies business. Glynis John (born in Wales by the way) who is so nervous to please to the point that she's accident prone cracks when he comes home and she's wrecked his system who decides then to ape old Arthur Critcht by bludgeoning him out of frustration then placing his bits into jars, goolies included lol. Put me off picked onions & gherkins for weeks that scene did. :mrgreen:
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Sun Jun 26, 2016 11:15 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:Talking magic movie moments...my favourite part was subsequent head dropping off scene and developing spider leg appendages, then scampering off before being torched.

Is that what Perry Como had in mind when he sang “Magic Moments”? Could be :o. Who doesn't enjoy slimy, amorphous, carnivorous, shape-shifting bug-eyed sci-fi critters sprouting limbs where they don’t belong?
I’m imagining Charles Darwin and Richard Dawkins sat in a cinema sharing a bucket of popcorn watching John Carpenter’s ‘The Thing’, both of them laughing hugely. Darwin whispers, “...I should’ve hired a better copyright attorney.” Did Glynis Johns put Terry-Thomas’ goolies in a jar too? Funnily enough I never noticed, probably because I didn’t want to. When he climbed into her gigantic knickers, now that was a magic moment :shock:.
The scene where Glynis is driven to a Peter Sutcliffe level of madness certainly turned the tables on the gents.
I’ll wager some women found it gratifying while some men shifted uncomfortably in their cinema seats.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Sun Jun 26, 2016 9:42 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:Talking magic movie moments...my favourite part was subsequent head dropping off scene and developing spider leg appendages, then scampering off before being torched.

Is that what Perry Como had in mind when he sang “Magic Moments”? Could be :o. Who doesn't enjoy slimy, amorphous, carnivorous, shape-shifting bug-eyed sci-fi critters sprouting limbs where they don’t belong?
I’m imagining Charles Darwin and Richard Dawkins sat in a cinema sharing a bucket of popcorn watching John Carpenter’s ‘The Thing’, both of them laughing hugely. Darwin whispers, “...I should’ve hired a better copyright attorney.” Did Glynis Johns put Terry-Thomas’ goolies in a jar too? Funnily enough I never noticed, probably because I didn’t want to. When he climbed into her gigantic knickers, now that was a magic moment :shock:.
The scene where Glynis is driven to a Peter Sutcliffe level of madness certainly turned the tables on the gents.
I’ll wager some women found it gratifying while some men shifted uncomfortably in their cinema seats.


I can confirm DOY that Terry Thomas's Goolies were indeed pickled by Glynis John for posterity. Ironically his posterior was used as a letter holder his winky a draft excluder. She wasted nothing. :mrgreen:
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Mon Jun 27, 2016 10:15 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:I can confirm DOY that Terry Thomas's Goolies were indeed pickled by Glynis John for posterity. Ironically his posterior was used as a letter holder his winky a draft excluder. She wasted nothing. :mrgreen:

The names men give their naughty bits :roll:. ‘Winky’ as draft excluder gets around and seems to be a recurring theme, an old skinflint similarly employs his in A Blackadder Christmas. Posterior as letter holder is another visual nobody needed, least of all postal workers :shock:. Reminds me of that hilarious scene in the Rising Damp crimbo special where Leonard Rossiter fails to get a mistletoe snog off Helen Fraser while she’s on duty, “Mr. Rigsby, you’re tampering with the Royal Mail!” :o. You’re right about ‘The Thing’ blood testing scene, when Thomas Waites casually wiped a shared scalpel on his jeans scientific rigor flew out the window and suspension of disbelief with it. Another awkward moment from the same scene, Kurt Russell touches the alien sample with a hot copper wire and anticipating the special effect he flinches before it leaps out of the petrie dish. Hey ho, it wouldn’t be a John Carpenter film without at least a few egregious flaws :wink:.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:52 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:I can confirm DOY that Terry Thomas's Goolies were indeed pickled by Glynis John for posterity. Ironically his posterior was used as a letter holder his winky a draft excluder. She wasted nothing. :mrgreen:

The names men give their naughty bits :roll:. ‘Winky’ as draft excluder gets around and seems to be a recurring theme, an old skinflint similarly employs his in A Blackadder Christmas. Posterior as letter holder is another visual nobody needed, least of all postal workers :shock:. Reminds me of that hilarious scene in the Rising Damp crimbo special where Leonard Rossiter fails to get a mistletoe snog off Helen Fraser while she’s on duty, “Mr. Rigsby, you’re tampering with the Royal Mail!” :o. You’re right about ‘The Thing’ blood testing scene, when Thomas Waites casually wiped a shared scalpel on his jeans scientific rigor flew out the window and suspension of disbelief with it. Another awkward moment from the same scene, Kurt Russell touches the alien sample with a hot copper wire and anticipating the special effect he flinches before it leaps out of the petrie dish. Hey ho, it wouldn’t be a John Carpenter film without at least a few egregious flaws :wink:.


Yeah I agree. The plethora of pet names for the obvious appendage is amazing for such a simple dimple. We don't have so many nick-names for say our legs, ears or nose, if any on that scale. Odd really how something so small and functional has such a world wide reputation? In a way those other bodily parts not as fortunate are linguistic outcasts who deserve equal treatment, therefore from now on my name for my legs will be bottom arms, my ears sound flaps, and my nose my meat trumpet, although that could be construed in a sexual way which is unintended. :?

You mention Black Adder's Christmas scene and Rising Damp. Love those series. Out of all the series of Blackadder was series one from 1983. The part with the infante of Spain (Miriam Margolies) and Black Prince Edmund who was forced to marry her to enable the joining both royal dynasties together. I loved the part in which poor manservant Baldric (Tony Robinson) took Edmunds place was basically bonked senseless by the Infante in the dark whilst her interpretor gave a running commentary such as " second round" and "don't hold back please my little one", lol.

Re Rising Damp. My favourite is the episode in which Rigsby gets hypnotised and the part where he puts on the French accent to Miss Jones and she chucks a cream flan in his face, lol. Best part is when he then pretends and Miss Jones sticks a hat pin in his backside, we see his reaction, he wanders out grimacing then screaming, lol. So funny. :lol:
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Sun Jul 03, 2016 3:29 pm

Ilovesteptoe wrote:In a way those other bodily parts not as fortunate are linguistic outcasts who deserve equal treatment, therefore from now on my name for my legs will be bottom arms, my ears sound flaps, and my nose my meat trumpet...

“I’m like that with my leg. By day this is my knee...by night the elbow of my leg.
By day my thumbs, by night the Pillars of Hercules!” (Bill Bailey, Qualmpeddler, 2013 ). Brilliant show :D.
I assume the Rising Damp episode you’ve described is from the fourth series, which I haven’t seen yet. Agree with you about Blackadder, in the first series everyone is so wonderfully, shamelessly over the top, with the exception of Baldrick as the only sane person around. His bruised and battered face after an, erm...romantic interlude...with the insatiable Spanish Infanta never fails to make me laugh, looks like he got kicked by a horse :shock:.
Jim Broadbent played the interpreter with such hilarious zeal, great fun :o.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Mon Jul 04, 2016 9:12 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:In a way those other bodily parts not as fortunate are linguistic outcasts who deserve equal treatment, therefore from now on my name for my legs will be bottom arms, my ears sound flaps, and my nose my meat trumpet...

“I’m like that with my leg. By day this is my knee...by night the elbow of my leg.
By day my thumbs, by night the Pillars of Hercules!” (Bill Bailey, Qualmpeddler, 2013 ). Brilliant show :D.
I assume the Rising Damp episode you’ve described is from the fourth series, which I haven’t seen yet. Agree with you about Blackadder, in the first series everyone is so wonderfully, shamelessly over the top, with the exception of Baldrick as the only sane person around. His bruised and battered face after an, erm...romantic interlude...with the insatiable Spanish Infanta never fails to make me laugh, looks like he got kicked by a horse :shock:.
Jim Broadbent played the interpreter with such hilarious zeal, great fun :o.


I advise you DOY to watch series four of Rising Damp, if able, as its hilarious lol. There hasn't been a sitcom since that's made me laugh due to the scenario and physical comedy. I was so saddened the day Leonard Rossiter passed in 1984. I think the last series he starred in before he passed doing a stage play Loot ( by Joe Orton) was called Trippers Day ( 1984). It was about a jobs-worth manager of a London Supermarket, a bit like Chris Barrie's ( Rimmer in Red Dwarf) Brittas Empire. Worth sourcing too. :)

Re Blackadder. If you noticed poor Baldric throughout the series had what was in effect reverse evolution. He started out as the intelligent one, Edmund & Percy the the fools, but ended the series as dense as an elephants dung pile. Very funny if not unfortunate on his part. However small. I loved every episode as said with favourite as mentioned being series one. The poignant episode was the final series when they went over the top to fight the hun and all got killed, so we are led to believe. I heared a couple of months ago that indeed Rowan Akinson & co was in talks to reprise the role. If this is true would be fantastic. 8)
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Tue Jul 05, 2016 11:20 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:I was so saddened the day Leonard Rossiter passed in 1984.

Saddens us still, thank goodness for video! My introduction to Leonard Rossiter came by way of Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece “Barry Lyndon” (1975) and it was immediately apparent he was hugely talented. I didn’t discover Rising Damp till relatively recently and thanks to everyone here for recommending it. For me Rigsby never stops being funny because he’s not a grotesque, his all too human flaws aren’t exaggerated, despite Rossiter’s hilariously frenetic interpretation of the tightfisted landlord. One of many favorite moments, a new tenant exclaims “There’s water running down the walls!” Ever ready with a sarky retort, Rigsby says “What did you expect, champagne?” :o.
Been watching one of my favorite third series Blackadder episodes “Sense and Senility” and only just now realized one of the obnoxious actors was played by Kenneth Connor of the Carry On’s :o. Connor could be a chameleon at times but beneath so much pancake and rouge no wonder I didn’t recognize him sooner. Many favorite bits in the third series, including Edmund comparing Baldrick’s never-washed, never-changed trousers to Pandora’s Box :shock:.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Thu Jul 07, 2016 8:49 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:I was so saddened the day Leonard Rossiter passed in 1984.

Saddens us still, thank goodness for video! My introduction to Leonard Rossiter came by way of Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece “Barry Lyndon” (1975) and it was immediately apparent he was hugely talented. I didn’t discover Rising Damp till relatively recently and thanks to everyone here for recommending it. For me Rigsby never stops being funny because he’s not a grotesque, his all too human flaws aren’t exaggerated, despite Rossiter’s hilariously frenetic interpretation of the tightfisted landlord. One of many favorite moments, a new tenant exclaims “There’s water running down the walls!” Ever ready with a sarky retort, Rigsby says “What did you expect, champagne?” :o.
Been watching one of my favorite third series Blackadder episodes “Sense and Senility” and only just now realized one of the obnoxious actors was played by Kenneth Connor of the Carry On’s :o. Connor could be a chameleon at times but beneath so much pancake and rouge no wonder I didn’t recognize him sooner. Many favorite bits in the third series, including Edmund comparing Baldrick’s never-washed, never-changed trousers to Pandora’s Box :shock:.



Re Leonard Rossiter. There's one actor you can say literally gave his life to make his audience laugh. He put so much into his performances it must have taken its toll, which it sadly did, on his health. He must have lost pounds during each episode as he put his body through so much stress and anguish. I know watching documentaries that he was a perfectionist and was very strict on takes expecting all to have as high standards as himself. He really loved the actors he worked with too, and they of him. I know he was devastated when the great Richard Beckinsale died in 1979, and Don Warrington (Philip) oftens reminisces of how a thoroughly nice man he was to work with, very competitive, loved his Tennis, and how when it came to any racial remarks commented towards his character in the series by (Rigsby) although not a racist was self opinionated, naive & ignorant and even though he lived in a ransacked house and voted Conservative, a party that in a future episode 7, S1, titled "Stand Up and Be Counted" (1974) would belittled him for his working class accent, house and roots. The story featured a British General Election where Philip, Alan & Miss JOnes were campaigning on behalf of the Labour party ( Rigsby hated) and he the Tories. :wink:

Also Rossiter quoted in interviews in the early eighties that being from Liverpool said he knew many bigots, so reassured Don that the bigotry reflected made ones look foolish and Philip the intellectual civilised one, which he very much was. I came to know the actor in the late seventies coincidentally in Rising Damp and of course seen him in that famous Steptoe episode Desperate Hours in repeats. Ironically where I lived was identical to the house being an old Victorian funeral directors house ( he says gulping). As a kid it was archaic with loads of moulding, tiled floors & beams, and yes you've guessed it, loads of mold and damp with the odd cockroach scampering about lol. The front door was identical to ours which made me smile lol. Ah, those were the days. :lol:
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Fri Jul 08, 2016 10:53 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:Ironically where I lived was identical to the house being an old Victorian funeral directors house (he says gulping). As a kid it was archaic with loads of moulding, tiled floors & beams, and yes you've guessed it, loads of mold and damp with the odd cockroach scampering about lol. The front door was identical to ours which made me smile lol. Ah, those were the days. :lol:

An old Victorian funeral directors house sounds quite nice actually 8). Brings to mind a favorite second series episode, “Things That Go Bump in the Night”. In that one Rossiter’s performance must’ve put the chippies to the test, when he explosively flees the seance room in terror you can see the set shaking :lol:.
You’ve reminded me of some of the places mates and me lived in, nothing that dated back to Victoria but close enough. Most of us lived in some degree of squalor when we were young and starting out, I’d rationalize it helps to build up bacteria resistance and whatever is left probably gets sorted by the booze. But thinking back, some of those places were so desperately grim you wouldn’t dare walk around without boots on. Everything from rats to roaches, snakes and spiders, insects of all kinds some of them deadly, layers of chipped paint, plaster falling off the walls, mushrooms on the ceilings, no heating or air-conditioning, newspaper instead of bog rolls, grim. Like so many other people that’s one of the reasons I was drawn to shows like Steptoe, Rising Damp and The Young Ones, having actually lived that way. Yet despite the squalor, the punk bits are very fond memories, happy days :o.
Coincidentally, recently got to see “The House in Nightmare Park”, fun picture but difficult to imagine it without Frankie Howerd. Much like Ride Again you can really see director Peter Sykes’ style at work. I assume the building exteriors were that place across the paddock from Bray Studios. Apparently it’s now a posh hotel, what a shame :(.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Fri Jul 08, 2016 9:32 pm

Dirty Old Yank wrote:
Ilovesteptoe wrote:Ironically where I lived was identical to the house being an old Victorian funeral directors house (he says gulping). As a kid it was archaic with loads of moulding, tiled floors & beams, and yes you've guessed it, loads of mold and damp with the odd cockroach scampering about lol. The front door was identical to ours which made me smile lol. Ah, those were the days. :lol:

An old Victorian funeral directors house sounds quite nice actually 8). Brings to mind a favorite second series episode, “Things That Go Bump in the Night”. In that one Rossiter’s performance must’ve put the chippies to the test, when he explosively flees the seance room in terror you can see the set shaking :lol:.
You’ve reminded me of some of the places mates and me lived in, nothing that dated back to Victoria but close enough. Most of us lived in some degree of squalor when we were young and starting out, I’d rationalize it helps to build up bacteria resistance and whatever is left probably gets sorted by the booze. But thinking back, some of those places were so desperately grim you wouldn’t dare walk around without boots on. Everything from rats to roaches, snakes and spiders, insects of all kinds some of them deadly, layers of chipped paint, plaster falling off the walls, mushrooms on the ceilings, no heating or air-conditioning, newspaper instead of bog rolls, grim. Like so many other people that’s one of the reasons I was drawn to shows like Steptoe, Rising Damp and The Young Ones, having actually lived that way. Yet despite the squalor, the punk bits are very fond memories, happy days :o.
Coincidentally, recently got to see “The House in Nightmare Park”, fun picture but difficult to imagine it without Frankie Howerd. Much like Ride Again you can really see director Peter Sykes’ style at work. I assume the building exteriors were that place across the paddock from Bray Studios. Apparently it’s now a posh hotel, what a shame :(.


Looks like your mates went through what I experienced as a child. As you know moving home a new, or in this case old, house for a family with small children was an adventure. We moved from an average semi when I was about three in 1975. I can still today remember it being really imposing, very creaky with all flaking paint. It looked enormous to me. Well I was 3ft and a fart. Now thinking, it did remind me of the Salem's Lot Marsden house minus James Mason or the Master of course lol. We lived there a few years until a neighbour said: "Did you know that the parlour was where they laid out the bodies?" Bodies my parents said, uh? , and she proceeded to tell my mother & father the history and how it was a funeral director's house/workshop, and before that stood many stone miners cottages long since demolished. See Swansea was then in the Victorian times and earlier (1700s) was the capital of world copper smelting. So besides dead bodies as a kid I had to worry about the ghosts of miners to contend with. Saying that my family had so many wonderful memories and even though we only lived there for eight years I consider it where all my memoires are. Loved the place. Still do even though it's long gone having been demolished the land terror-formed for a motorway and fast food outlet. My only regret is that we never took many photos, one if any. That haunts me still today. The only images got is my childhood memory, and that's getting misty with age. :|

Re House on Nightmare park: What a wonderfully quirky film. Written by fellow Welshman the late Terry Nation of Doctor who & Blake 7 fame plus many other classic comedy sitcoms in the sixties. This film has stayed in my memory for years and was the very reason I sourced that Australian 13x30in poster framed and uploaded recently with my others. Just love the whole atmos of the movie. Frankie Howerd played his character as himself. All his characters be it Carry On films whatever was Frankie Howerd, and why? It worked, and why not. Loved his other famous role in Up-Pompeii series & film as Roman slave Lurcio. Brilliant. Classic TV. 8)
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Sun Jul 10, 2016 10:07 am

Ilovesteptoe wrote:Now thinking, it did remind me of the Salem's Lot Marsden house minus James Mason or the Master of course lol. We lived there a few years until a neighbour said: "Did you know that the parlour was where they laid out the bodies?" Bodies my parents said, uh? , and she proceeded to tell my mother & father the history and how it was a funeral director's house/workshop, and before that stood many stone miners cottages long since demolished. See Swansea was then in the Victorian times and earlier (1700s) was the capital of world copper smelting. So besides dead bodies as a kid I had to worry about the ghosts of miners to contend with. Saying that my family had so many wonderful memories and even though we only lived there for eight years I consider it where all my memoires are. Loved the place. Still do even though it's long gone having been demolished the land terror-formed for a motorway and fast food outlet.

James Mason and his vampire master Kurt Barlow wouldn’t be nearly as annoying as David Soul creeping about the house with his crude crucifix clumsily cobbled together from a couple of tongue depressors and slinging water all over the walls :roll:. It’s a crime of unimaginable scale really, when corrupt politicians, greedy industrialists and their ilk create so called “eminent domain” laws to destroy beautiful historic neighbourhoods, typically without a care to properly document them. Twas ever thus. Capel Celyn comes to mind. I’ve lived in places that resembled the Marsden house too but the interior looks like the festering aftermath of the world’s biggest booze-up! Debris of all kinds on every surface in every direction, yet James Mason mysteriously managed to always look smart, his suits impeccably tidy 8). I take it you enjoy vampire movies, in which case there’s an excellent book you might look for, “Vampires, Burial and Death” by Paul Barber (Yale University Press 1988, reissued with new preface 2010).
An influential work, impressive scholarship, very well researched and a good read :o. Time not wasted.
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Ilovesteptoe » Sat Jul 16, 2016 6:57 pm

Yes, that scene mentioned with David Soul initially with his Doctor friend ,then alone, which he awaits the rise of Danny Glick mother (James Mason's wife real life), and his ad hoc sticky tape tongue stick crucifix quick-fix until we see the livid lifeless body (so we thought) star to twitch erratically, then move on the mortuary slab was terrifying, even though I've seen it numerous times. :P

Very interesting that you mentioned Capel Celyn. In 1956/57 Westminster parliament flooded the Welsh speaking village of Capel Celyn in Bala, Gwynedd, north Wales. They basically flattened cottages, graves were dug up, sadder still , not all the bodies buried could be relocated or found as some graves were 100s of years old, so still lie at the bottom of the man-made lake which was created for Liverpool's water consumption. A travesty really as 67 people lost their homes, locals were promised jobs during construction, but jobs were largely given to workers from outside Wales, and finally when the dam was finally built locals to the area paid more for their water that the people of Liverpool, and currently do. Worse still. Because we never had our own government (unlike now) the only national voice was our 36 elected MPs from Wales who voted 35/36 against with one abstaining who were totally ignored by Whitehall? A stain on British democracy.

Also the building of dams in Wales has occurred many years before in the late 1800s through to 1960s by Westminster. It caused huge tensions then, even the British army & police were brought in, some people died too. The mere mention of Tryweryn send shivers and causes a lot of anger & tension, even now. The treatment towards Wales gave birth to many language and home rule campaigners and gave momentum to political party Plaid Cymru. It also encouraged many freedom fighter groups too, in particular Meibion Glyndwr who fought throughout the 1960s, their aim to stop similar occurring again. Problem was with all freedom fighting groups things it turns ugly (on both sides) as daubed in paint, holiday homes were torched, and in Wales their was a lot of division with certain ones methodology used. See even today certain governmental powers retained in London. Also they have a clause stating if England's water supply is threaten by any devolution policies if adverse from Cardiff bay's Senedd there will be government intervention. It's an eye opener to some outside the UK who assume Britain is the bastion of democracy & freedom of speech and promoter of fair play. Reality is. Sadly no. :(

Sorry to end on a depressing note. Thought you'd like to know it's sad history of such a beautiful area of Wales. :|
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Re: UK Monster Club Quad Poster (1980)

Postby Dirty Old Yank » Wed Jul 20, 2016 2:41 pm

“Ad hoc sticky tape tongue stick crucifix quick-fix”, brilliant :o.
Where does one find that? Local chemist? Hardware store? Hobby shop? Occult dispensary?
Wandering up and down supermarket aisles with increasing frustration till finally asking, courteously of course, “Could you please direct me to the ad hoc sticky tape tongue stick crucifix quick-fix? I saw it on the telly" :mrgreen:.
That bit where Mrs. Mason’s forehead is burned by Soul’s hastily fashioned talisman, I first saw that scenario on telly as a kid, performed by Peter Cushing in Hammer’s 1958 classic “Dracula.” Was then and still is a favorite film 8).
That sort of telly programming, free and didn't encourage stupefaction in viewers, is tragically a thing of the past.
"I'm a rag n' bone man, I'm not a poxy grave robber!"
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